Open Access
UNESCO and AU's Media and Information Literacy Course

 

Open Access
UNESCO and AU's Media and Information Literacy Course

My Journal of Learning Experiences

My Journal of Learning Experiences Guidelines

Learning journals are useful tools for sorting out your understanding of a topic of study. They are most effective when you complete them on a regular basis - we recommend one for each unit in the course.

A journal of about 200 words for each unit is likely sufficient. Here are some suggestions about writing journals.

What is Journaling?

Physically, a journal could be hand-written in a book or on paper that you store in a ring-binder or a folder. A journal could also be kept digitally or electronically: that is, typed on a computer or mobile device, or audio-recorded.

A journal is a record of daily events, happenings or experiences.  It is similar to keeping a diary. However it is more than a diary, since journaling requires conscious reflection, documentation of your thoughts, and reviewing and commenting on your written thoughts.

Benefits of Journaling as a part of this course

Journaling during this course will help you to think. It will aid your memory and enable you to record your experiences while they are fresh in your mind. Journaling should cause you to ask yourself general questions such as:

  1. What did I do?
  2. Why did I do it?
  3. What decision did I take and why?
  4. Did I change my opinion about certain things and why?
  5. What did I not do and why? etc.

Organizing your Journal

In a structured journal, you might ask yourself the following questions:

  1.  What new information did I learn from the MIL course or my interaction with other people during the day or week?
  2. How does this new information affect what I think about media, the internet, libraries, and archives?
  3. How does this new information affect what I think about such topics as gender equality, intercultural dialogue and freedom of expression and freedom of information?
  4. How does this information affect what I do now?
  5. How might this information affect what I do in the future?
  6. How did the course design aid my learning? Think in relation to the content, multimedia resources, and any other aspects of the course that you found helpful or not.
Last modified: Thursday, 17 September 2015, 2:58 PM MDT
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